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MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING (MRI) FOR PELVIC ORGAN PROLAPSE

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Abstract

The purpose of our study was to improve th e quality of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) diagnostic using static and dynamic MRI. We com pared 60 MRI in woman with POP and 20 controls according to the grade of prolapses and pelvic floor relaxation, asymmetry of pubococcygeal and puborectalis muscle. According to the prevalent component of the
prolapsus, the patien ts divided: сystocele – 21 (35%), сystourethrocele – 9 (15%), urethrocele – 3 (5%), vaginal prolapse – 6 (10%), uterine prolapse – 6 (10%), enterocele – 3 (5%), rectocele – 12 (20%). Measurements of the supporting structures were significant (p<.05) in the identification of pelvic floor laxity. The combined static and dynamic MRI can
provide useful information according certain structural abnormalities with specific disfunction, and could be necessary for surgeons as a complement method in planning operation technique.

About the Authors

M. N. Barinova
The State Education Institution of Higher Professional Training The First Sechenov Moscow State Medical University under Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation
Russian Federation


A. E. Solopova
The State Education Institution of Higher Professional Training The First Sechenov Moscow State Medical University under Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation
Russian Federation


N. V. Tupikina
Moscow State University of Medicine and Dentistry
Russian Federation


G. R. Kasyan
Moscow State University of Medicine and Dentistry
Russian Federation


D. Ju. Pushkar
Moscow State University of Medicine and Dentistry
Russian Federation


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For citation:


Barinova M.N., Solopova A.E., Tupikina N.V., Kasyan G.R., Pushkar D.J. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING (MRI) FOR PELVIC ORGAN PROLAPSE. Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproduction. 2014;8(1):37-46. (In Russ.)

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ISSN 2313-7347 (Print)
ISSN 2500-3194 (Online)