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Thrombophilia identified as a risk factor for thrombogenesis in cancer patients

https://doi.org/10.17749/2313-7347/ob.gyn.rep.2021.232

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Abstract

Aim: to assess a rate and range of genetic and acquired thrombophilia in onco-gynecologic patients with ovarian cancer, uterine corpus cancer and cervical cancer.

Materials and Мethods. A prospective controlled cohort non-randomized interventional study was conducted: within the years 2014 to 2020, there were examined 546 women with genital malignancies, divided into 2 groups: group I – 155 cancer patients with former thrombosis, group II – 391 women with female genital cancer without former thrombotic complications. Control group consisted of 137 patients with benign female genital tumors. The spectrum of circulating APA was studied: antibodies to â2-glycoprotein I (â2-GPI), annexin V and prothrombin as well as genetic thrombophilia due to mutations genes encoding factor V Leiden, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) including polymorphism in genes for prothrombin, platelet glycoproteins and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1).

Results. It was found that frequency of circulating APA as well as incidence rate of genetic thrombophilia between cancer patients from group I vs. group II significantly differed: APA in group I vs. group II was 86 (55.5 %; p < 0.01) vs. 92 (23.5 %) compared to 7 (5.1 %) in control group. Genetic thrombophilia was dominated in group I by mutated MTHFR (92.9 %), polymorphismin PAI-1 (28.4 %) and platelet glycoprotein (44.5 %) that were significantly higher (p < 0.05) compared to group II and control group. Hence, it allows to suggest that such identified thrombophilia markers are largely associated with a risk of developing thrombotic complications.

Conclusion. Detected high percentage of patients with circulating APA and genetic thrombophilia among cancer patients with former thromboembolic complications corroborate a role for genetic and acquired thrombophilia in developing pre-thrombotic condition. Detecting a range of circulating APA and genetic thrombophilia allows to identify patients who might be referred to a high risk of thrombogenesis and require to preventive application of anticoagulant therapy.

About the Authors

A. V. Vorobev
Sechenov University
Russian Federation

Alexander V. Vorobev – MD, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Filatov Clinical Institute of Children’s Health

Scopus Author ID: 57191966265; Researcher ID: F-8804-2017

2 bldg. 4, Bolshaya Pirogovskaya Str., Moscow 119991



A. D. Makatsariya
Sechenov University
Russian Federation

Alexander D. Makatsariya – MD, Dr Sci Med, Professor, Academician of RAS, Head of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Filatov Clinical Institute of Children’s Health

Scopus Author ID: 57222220144; Researcher ID: M-5660-2016

2 bldg. 4, Bolshaya Pirogovskaya Str., Moscow 119991



V. O. Bitsadze
Sechenov University
Russian Federation

Viktoriya O. Bitsadze – MD, Dr Sci Med, Professor of RAS, Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Filatov Clinical Institute of Children’s Health

Scopus Author ID: 6506003478; Researcher ID: F-8409-2017

2 bldg. 4, Bolshaya Pirogovskaya Str., Moscow 119991



A. G. Solopova
Sechenov University
Russian Federation

Antonina G. Solopova – MD, Dr Sci Med, Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Filatov Clinical Institute of Children's Health

Scopus Author ID: 6505479504. Researcher ID: Q-1385-2015

2 bldg. 4, Bolshaya Pirogovskaya Str., Moscow 119991



D. A. Ponomarev
Maternity Hospital № 4 – Branch of Vinogradov City Clinical Hospital, Moscow Healthcare Department
Russian Federation

Dmitry A. Ponomarev – MD, Obstetrician-Gynecologist of the Highest Category, Head

3 Novatorov Str., Moscow 119421



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For citation:


Vorobev A.V., Makatsariya A.D., Bitsadze V.O., Solopova A.G., Ponomarev D.A. Thrombophilia identified as a risk factor for thrombogenesis in cancer patients. Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproduction. 2021;15(3):228-235. (In Russ.) https://doi.org/10.17749/2313-7347/ob.gyn.rep.2021.232

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